Vicphysics Teachers' Network Inc.
Dear *|FNAME|*,

There are more resources online as a follow up to the webinar Vicphysics ran during the school holidays.

ANSTO is running an innovative event for students from Years 7 to 11, working in teams.  Registrations open today and close next Monday, so hurry!


The second section of the next meeting of the Vicphysics Teachers' Network will be a PD on Practical Investigations.  It will take the form a discussion around some guiding questions.  It will be on Zoom and run from 6:00pm to 7:00pm on Wednesday, 5th August.   If you wish to participate, please email Vicphysics

Jane Coyle (Pres), Dr Barbara McKinnon (Vice-Pres), Dan O'Keeffe OAM (Sec) and Paul Walters (Treas)

Table of Contents
  1.  Vicphysics Webinar:  More resources are online and a one hour PD on Practical Investigations
  2.  Real Research Data with Student Worksheets from ANSTO
  3. A research review of the best fabrics for face masks: An example of good science, detailed data analysis and excellent pedagogy.
  4. Seeking a Physics teacher? Seeking a job?
       5. Events for Students and General Public
  • ANSTO National Science Week Hackathon. Registrations open 27th July
  • Behind the Scenes of Big Science, 7:00pm - 8:30pm, Weds, 19th August
  • UNSW Bragg Science Prize for Science Writing for Years 7 - 10. Entries by 27th August, 2020
       6. Events for Teachers
  • 2020 Physics in the Cloud: A Physics Free-For-All Variety Night. 6:00pm, Friday, 21st August
       7. Physics News from the Web 
  • 3D ultrafast Doppler ultrasound quantifies coronary blood flow.
  • Earth's atmosphere rings like a giant bell, say researchers
  • The fifth state of matter, a Bose-Einstein condensate, is made onboard the International Space Station
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1.  Vicphysics Webinar: More resources and a one hour PD on Practical Investigations
Vicphysics held a webinar on the last Friday of the mid year holidays about planning for the second half of 2020.
The previous newsletter mentioned  that the videos of the sections were now online. 
Further material has been added, see below.  These resources are available here.

Presentations:

  • Reporting of data and Data Analysis in Practical Investigations (extra material)
Extra Support documents:
  • 2 Log book samples
  • Spreadsheet of sample data of a basketball bounce with analysis and annotations
PD on Practical Investigations
Vicphysics invites you to participate in a one hour network meeting at 6:00pm, Wednesday, 5th August. This will be a forum for discussing aspects of recording, processing and analysing data in practical investigations, with the aim of producing resources that are useful to current teachers and/or students of VCE.

Please check here resources to be used as discussion starters, as well as for discussion questions.
To participate please email Vicphysics and the Zoom link will be forwarded to you in the days before the event.

2. Real Research Data with Student Worksheets from ANSTO
ANSTO have developed some guided worksheets to help students analyse real data sets from ANSTO research. Students can graph data, make calculations, draw conclusions and answer discussion questions using provided background reading.
The worksheets and data sets examine different research topics, including:

  • Greenhouse gas concentrations from Antarctic ice cores over 800,000 years
  • Fine particle air pollution
  • Radionuclides in medicine
  • Investigating radiation in the air we breathe
The data sets and worksheets are available here.  Copies of the solutions are available on request from here

 Return to top

3. A research review of the best fabrics for face masks: An example of good science, detailed data analysis and excellent pedagogy.
The presenter of this Youtube video was keen to design a face mask with the best fabrics, so she did a search of the scientific literature and found an article on testing fabrics for masks.  The video describes their testing process, explains and interprets the data in a way that will engage students and also produces a practical product in the end.
The Vicphysics Teachers' Network set up a Job Ads page on our website to assist schools in finding a physics teacher, either to be a LSL replacement or to fill an ongoing position or just to cover an extended sick leave.
  • There is one Government school seeking a physics teacher: Parkdale Secondary College
This webpage is updated every weekend.  The webpage also has a link on how schools can register a position and also lodge a payment for this service.

5. Events for Students and General Public
a) ANSTO National Science Week Hackathon.  Registrations open 27th July and close 3rd August.
Hackathons are high-energy sprint-like events where participants work in a team, with the help of mentors, to design and build a solution to a problem.
The Australian Museum and ANSTO are excited to announce ANSTO's National Science Week Hackathon for Australian secondary students in Years 7-11 as part of National Science Week 2020.
The theme is: “How can we use our oceans to innovate for a changing climate?”
The first 20 teams to submit a complete registration form will receive $100 to use towards their hack. Official registration for this online event opens on Mon 27 July and closes on Mon 3 August.
To register a team and more details, click here. It seems you can register a team without supplying names, but years level(s) are required, It appears names and parental permission slips can be supplied later.
Recommended team size is 3 - 7 students.
Timeline: 
Friday, 14th August: Problem challenges are released.  Teams review challenges, pitch ideas, choose a mentor *, finalise team roles, begin team work.  * Currently there is a list of 10 at the link above.
Sat and Sun, 15th and 16th August.  Teams work on their proposal.
Monday, 17th August.  Teams meet with mentors, revise and re-work their project.
Tuesday, 18th August. Teams create video presentations of their solutions and submit.
Prize pool: $1000 and medals for first and second places.


b) Behind the Scenes of Big Science, 7:00pm - 8:30pm, Weds 19th August
This National Science Week ANSTO are giving the public a unique opportunity to see behind the scenes at the Australian Centre for Neutron Science, online and for free.  Students can see the different kinds of instruments the Centre hosts, and hear the results that they bring.  Five of their scientists will each walk the students through their world-class science machines, and after there will be a live Q&A where they can quiz them more.  This is a rare opportunity to see behind the scenes of this big science factory.  
 
When: Wednesday 19 August, 7pm-8.30pm (AEST)
To register, click here. There is no cost.


c) UNSW Bragg Prize for Science Writing for Years 7 - 10. Entries close 27th August.
The 2020 Theme is 'The Big Ideas saving the Planet'.
Students write up to 800 words to describe some scientific research that has delivered a solution that the student believes could change the future for the planet.
This website has entry details, as well as FAQs, Teacher's resources and Writing tips.
 
6. Events for Teachers
a) 2020 Physics in the Cloud: A Physics Free-For-All Variety Night, 6:00pm, Friday, 2st August
Physics in the Pub has gone virtual! An AIP Initiative.
Tiny magnets, cell goop and the future of the Universe
"We’ve digitized and uploaded our scientists and they’ll be streaming to you from the cloud, about the complex protein structures in our cells, how tiny magnets can cure cancer and, well, the philosophy of everything!
There’ll be songs, poems and quizzes, so have your device ready. Grab yourself a drink and join us online, with host Dr Phil Dooley of Phil Up On Science."
Cost: Free, thanks to the AIP
For more information, click on Facebook here
To register, click here


7.   Physics from the Web
Items selected from the bulletin of the Institute of Physics (UK).
Each item below includes the introductory paragraphs and a web link to the rest of the article.

a) 3D ultrafast Doppler ultrasound quantifies coronary blood flow

In the peripheral arteries, non-invasive, non-ionizing Doppler ultrasound imaging is used instead of angiography. But for cardiac applications, Doppler imaging is difficult, because of the rapid motion of the myocardium and the insufficient definition of conventional ultrasound.
To overcome this challenge, researchers recently introduced a method called ultrafast Doppler coronary angiography (UDCA), which uses 2D ultrafast ultrasound to visualize coronary vessels as small as 100 µm in a beating heart. They have now extended their UDCA approach to three dimensions, enabling 3D imaging and quantification of coronary blood flow in a single heartbeat.

b) Earth’s atmosphere rings like a giant bell, say researchers

The Earth’s entire atmosphere vibrates like a giant bell, with various large-scale resonant waves travelling in both directions around the globe. That is the conclusion of scientists in Japan and the US, who have confirmed a nearly two-centuries-old hypothesis by Laplace of atmospheric resonance. Their research should help improve both weather forecasts and long-term climate forecasts.

c) The fifth state of matter , a Bose–Einstein condensate, is made onboard the International Space Station
A Bose–Einstein condensate (BEC), known as the fifth state of matter, is a dilute gas of bosonic atoms whose temperature is so low that their wavelength becomes comparable to the distance between one atom and the next. In these circumstances the atoms all occupy the same quantum state and act in unison as a superfluid – so bringing otherwise microscopic wavelike properties into the macroscopic realm.

Physicists usually make BECs by confining a gas of bosonic atoms in a magnetic trap and firing laser beams at the particles to cool them down. The snag is having to release the condensate to study it. Once free, the atoms repel one another and quickly spread out if they are not cold enough – making the gas too tenuous to be detectable. But gravity also poses a major problem, its downward tug causing the atoms to collide with the bottom of the experimental apparatus within a fraction of a second.

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