Vicphysics Teachers' Network Inc.
Dear *|FNAME|*,

Last days: The Survey for the Review of the Physics Study Design finishes tomorrow, Friday, 18th October.  So far there have been 73 responses.

There is a talk for physics teachers on using Amusement Parks to assist student learning.  It will be at Swinburne University on Thursday, 31st October at 6pm.  Booking is required.


The next meeting of the Vicphysics Teachers' Network will be on Thursday, 17th October at Melbourne Girls' College starting at 5:00pm.  Teachers are welcome to these meetings. If you wish to come, please email Vicphysics

Frances Sidari (Pres), Jane Coyle (Vice-Pres), Dan O'Keeffe (Sec) and Terry Tan (Treas)
 
Table of Contents
  1. Amusement Park Physics Lecture: 6pm, Thursday, 31st October, Swinburne University
  2. Survey for Review of Physics Study Design
  3. Some Useful Internet Resources
  4. Seeking a Physics Teacher? Seeking a job?
  5. Events for Students and General Public
  • The Cosmic Perspective, 6:30pm, 18th October, Swinburne University Fully Booked
  • Brian Cox, A Symphonic Universe, 11:00am, 15th November, Hamer Hall, Arts Centre
  • Mystery Guest, 7:00pm, 29th November, Swinburne University
  • Physics Days at Luna Park: 3rd March - 6th March
       6. Events for Teachers
  • Nanoparticles: Exploiting light and colour. 7:00pm, Thursday, 24th October, Royal Society of Victoria
       7. Physics News from the Web
  • Record breaking fusion reaction could transform medical isotope production.
  • Nobel Prize for Physics: Background articles and original key papers
  • Nobel Prize for Chemistry: Background articles and original key papers
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1. Amusement Park Physics Lecture: 6pm, Thursday, 31st October, Swinburne University
Title: Amusement Parks as informal learning environments: Physics, maths and technology for the whole body
Abstract:  Luna Park ca be seen as a large physics laboratory, where your own body can feel many times heavier than normal or experience seconds of free fall weightlessness and live to tell the tale.  The forces on the body can also be captured with a smart phone, when built-in acceleration, rotation and pressure sensors capture the motion.
The data offers rich opportunities to discuss challenging physics - acceleration is no longer abstract when experienced in your own body.  In this way acceleration can be accessible to younger learners.  The function of sensors can also be illustrated by simple toys, such as a short slinky spring providing visual measurements of 'g forces' and a soft toy on a string used as  miniature Foucault pendulum to illustrate rotation measurements.
The presentation also addresses pedagogical strategies to ensure that an exciting outing also results in student learning.
Speaker: Prof Ann-Marie Pendrill is Professor of Physics and Director of the Swedish National Resource Centre for Physics Education.  She has used Amusement Parks in physics teaching since 1995, in physics, engineering and teacher education programs, as well as in teacher professional development.  She has been involved in arranging large scale STEM days Liseberg and Grona Land, amusement parks in Sweden. Her articles can be found here.
Ann-Marie is in Melbourne partly to record data from some of Luna Park's distinctive rides.  She will be at Luna Park on Friday evening, 1st November.
Date: Thursday, 31st October
Time: 6:00pm
Venue: Swinburne University, Hawthorn Campus, EN103, Engineering building.  Map
Tickets: Free, but you need to register, click here.
Dinner: If you wish to join others for dinner with the speaker afterwards at a nearby restaurant, please indicate when you register.
Extra: Doug Bail from Ciderhouse ICT will display data logging equipment from 5:30pm.
Queries: Please contact Vicphysics if you have nay questions

2. Survey for Review of Physics Study Design Closes Friday, 18th October
VCAA is conducting a review of the Physics Study Design.  They have asked Vicphysics to conduct a survey of physics teachers on aspects of Units 1 and 2 of the current study design to inform the development of the next study design.

The survey is anonymous and responses will be treated with strict confidentiality.  Vicphysics will provide the VCAA with a report of the aggregated data.  The survey will close on 18th October.  The survey can be accessed here.
3. Some Useful Internet Resources
Youtube videos:
The Power Grid. A series of 4 videos (US based) called 'Practical Engineering' . It covers i) how the grid works, ii) How electricity Generation really works, iii) How do substations work, iv) How do Transmission Lines work..  The narration takes an engineering approach.
The Engineering Mindset  A series of short educational US videos from the basics to three phase power.
Up and Atom.  A series of videos by Jade Tan Holmes on quantum physics and maths paradoxes.  She is a young Australian physicist, her style is engaging and her explanations clear, although at the more demanding end.

LIGO and Gravitational Wave Astronomy.  The LIGO website now has educational resources for teachers as well as general science articles.  Look under 'Educational Resources'.
4. Seeking a Physics Teacher? Seeking a job?
Last year Vicphysics Teachers' Network set up a Job Ads page on our website to assist schools in finding a physics teacher, either to be a LSL replacement or to fill an ongoing position or just to cover an extended sick leave.  Several schools placed notices.
The web page also lists the Government schools seeking a physics teachers, currently there are three.  This web page will be updated every weekend.
The webpage also has a link on how schools can register a position and also lodge a payment for the service.
a) The Cosmic Perspective , 6:30pm, 18th October, Swinburne University- Fully Booked
Dr Ned Taylor from the Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing at Swinburne University will present the talk in EN103.  For more details and to book, click here.

b)  Brian Cox, A Symphonic Universe, 11:00am, 15th November, Hamer Hall, Arts Centre
An MSO Education Concert for upper primary and secondary students.
  Be whisked through space and time by Professor Cox in this science meets music, special schools-only event. Joining Professor Cox on stage will be conductor Daniel Harding, to lead the Orchestra through some of classical music’s most universal repertoire.

MSO Education Concerts for secondary schools offer you and your students the opportunity to explore the power of music in colourful, engaging, narrative-based concert experiences.

Recommended for secondary school-aged students, with broader suitability at the discretion of teachers.

To discuss the suitability of this content to the learning interests and needs of your students, please feel free to contact the MSO education team: schools@mso.com.au.
Important information
Ticket price: $17 per ticket, one free teacher per 10 students  Duration: 50min.
To book tickets, click here.


c) Mystery Guest, 7:00pm, 29th November, Swinburne University
A special End of Year Lecture in ATC101.  For more details and to book, click here.

d) Physics Days at Luna Park: 3rd March - 6th March
The dates for 2020 are Tuesday, 3rd March to Friday, 6th March.

Bookings are open for next year's Physics Days at Luna Park, click on 'Events'.  You can make a booking for a particular day this year and change your day once your timetable for 2020 is known. But please remember to notify Luna Park on any change of date at least a fortnight before the event.
An aerobatic display by a member of the Roulettes has been requested, but confirmation is often not provided before February next year.

Return to top

6. Events for Teachers

  • Nanoparticles: Exploiting light and colour, 7:00pm, Thursday, 24th October, Royal Society of Victoria
    Nanoparticles, usually 500-100,000 times thinner than a human hair, have a fascinating range of properties due to their small size. Dr Rajesh Ramanathan and colleagues exploit these properties to create a range of new applications and technologies.
    These include sensors that mimic our own senses of smell and taste in response to colour; light-active antibacterials that can kill bacteria by simply shining a light, and biomedical imaging that can visualise biological processes in real-time. The underlying innovation in each case involves controlling the surface properties of exciting new nanomaterials.
    Join the 2019 recipient of the Phillip Law Postdoctoral Award for the Physical Sciences to learn about the frontiers of nanobiotechnology being explored to create new materials, imaging applications and biomedical technologies.
    To register
    Cost: $11 for lecture, $27.50 for lecture plus dinner at 6:00pm before lecture.
    Venue: Royal Society of Victoria, 8 La Trobe St, Melbourne.
    There is also a short Youtube video (10 min) of a recent RSV talk on Dark Matter Down Under by Prof Alan Duffy from Swinburne University.
7.   Physics from the Web
Items selected from the bulletin of the Institute of Physics (UK).
Each item below includes the introductory paragraphs and a web link to the rest of the article.

Record breaking fusion reaction could transform medical isotope production

Nuclear technology companies Phoenix and SHINE Medical Technologies have achieved a new world record for a nuclear fusion reaction in a steady-state system, the strongest of its kind ever produced on Earth. The reaction yielded 46 trillion (4.6×1013) neutrons per second, eclipsing the previous record by nearly 25% and setting a new standard for neutron generator technology.

This breakthrough could prove great news for the field of nuclear medicine. SHINE was founded in 2010 to create a safe, cost-effective and environmentally-friendly technology to produce medical isotopes. And it’s using Phoenix’s high-flux neutron generators to achieve this.

Nobel Prize for Physics: 'for contributions to our understanding of the evolution of the universe and Earth’s place in the cosmos'. Background articles and key papers
Nobel Prize for Chemistry: 'for the development of lithium-ion batteries'.   Background articles and key papers.
These two links to PhysicsWorld articles not only have descriptions of the winners' achievement, but also include links to several articles that provide context as well as links to the collections of the original key papers. The latter being available free until 31st October.

 
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